How to Play the Major Pentatonic Scale I for Guitar

The major pentatonic I scale for the guitar is frequently used in blues, jazz, rock, pop and funk music. It can be used to create lead melody lines as well as improvised guitar solos. Learning to play this scale with the proper fingering and in different positions of the neck immediately adds a new dimension to your lead guitar playing.

Lay your left-hand index finger on the sixth string, third fret. Pluck the string to sound the note.

Place your left-hand ring finger on the fifth fret of the sixth string. Attack the string to sound the note.

Position your left-hand index finger on the fifth string, second fret. Play the note with the left hand.

Lay your left-hand pinky finer on the fifth fret on the fifth string. Pluck the note with your right hand.

Place your left-hand index finger on the second fret of the fourth string. Strike the string with your right hand finger or pick.

Position your left-hand pinky finger on the fourth string, fifth fret and attack the string with your right hand.

Lay your left-hand index finger on the third string, second fret. Play the note.

Place your left-hand ring finger on the fourth fret of the third string. Attack the note.

Position your left-hand index finger on the second string, third fret. Pluck the note.

Lay your left-hand ring finger on the fifth fret of the second string and attack the string to sound the note.

Place your left-hand index finger on the first string, third fret. Play the string.

Position your left-hand ring finger on the first string, fifth fret. Pluck the note with your right hand finger or pick.

Play all twelve notes in order to sound the G major pentatonic scale I for guitar. Refer to the given example if necessary.

Play the major pentatonic scale I on different frets of the sixth string. The first note of the scale is the root and will tell you how to name each scale. For example, playing this scale on the seventh fret of the sixth string produces a B major pentatonic scale I for guitar.

Singing along as you practice this scale will help get this new sound into your ears as well as under your fingers.





Approved by Jesse Anderson